How to make a D&D character

How to make a D&D character

Bryce D

Have you ever been invited to play in a D&D campaign and not known how to make a character? If so, then this will be a great way to learn how to make a character. First of all, you need a character sheet, which you can just print one off of the internet, this sheet will keep all of the information about your character that you will need to play. You can do the following steps in any order, but there is a recommended order just to make it a little bit easier, as well as a bit faster. The first step to making a D&D character is to choose a race from the following, Human Aasimar, Warforged, Yuanti-Pureblood, Dwarf Triton, Goliath, Tabaxi, Dragonborn, Half-Elf, LizardFolk, Gnome, Genasi, Aarakocra, Elf, Tiefling, Bugbear, Kenku, Githyanki, or Tortle. All of the races have different abilities which can change your whole character. The next step is to choose your class, which decides what weapons, spells and abilities you have. There are 12 D&D classes consisting of Barbarian, Bard, Cleric, Druid, Fighter, Monk, Paladin, Ranger, Rogue, Sorcerer, Warlock, or Wizard. The next step is probably the most important step for how you want your characters to play out, rolling for stats, or using the point buy system. In D&D, you have six main stats, strength, dexterity, wisdom, intelligence, charisma, and constitution. Using the point buy system is where you start with an 8 in all stats and are given 27 points to put into your various stats, but they can only go up to 18, but in some special occasions, because of your race bonus they can go up to 19 or 20. Choosing your background is the next step, it gives very minor bonuses, but those bonuses can be very helpful in some situations. Your starting equipment is dependent on your class, so i’m not going to list those, because that would make this article way too long. The next step is to choose your character’s name, this has no effect other than what the other PCs, and NPCs call your character. PC stands for Player character, and NPC stands for non-player character. Each race knows different languages off of the start, some are self-explanatory, like dwarfs knowing dwarvish and elves knowing elvish, but some are a bit weird, like the Kenku race, they can only say words that they have heard before. Picking your character’s alignment is very important, because it is how everyone views your character. There are nine alignments, lawful good, neutral good, chaotic good, lawful neutral, neutral neutral, chaotic neutral, lawful evil, neutral evil, and chaotic evil. The next step is to calculate your HP, which is class based, so I won’t go into it. The last step is pick the spells you want if you are a spellcaster. Congratulations, you now have a basic D&D character, so go out and join someone’s campaign. Not right now though because of Coronavirus.